David Platt on Racism and Why Your Church is so White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MLK: “Men should NOT be judged by the color of their skin.”

T4G: “Pastors should be judged by the color of their congregations.” – Pastor Jim Osman

 

David Platt took the opportunity at the 2018 Together for the Gospel conference to guilt-shame the predominately Anglo-American attendees for their unconfessed racism. (Watch the full message below).

Eisegetically launching from Amos chapter 5 as his proof-text, Platt accused “white” Christians of ignoring the social injustice happening throughout the black communities in America. He further lamented the racial “segregation” among congregations, accusing white churches in particular of “deepening the divide” between black churches. Rather than helping to overcome racism, white churches are a force continuing racism, he opined. He asked wonderingly, “why are so many churches so white?” He even went on to note the majority “whiteness” of Bible colleges, seminaries, and even the T4G conference. Platt then outlined a handful of action points for the white folks to consider so they could recognize the unconfessed racism in their hearts.

Needless to say, Platt’s message stirred up controversy among folks on social media. I am more of the opinion that it was sowing discord among the brethren, but I’m a white guy with racial blind spots, so I’m not supposed to say that. While I recognize a racial divide exists in the church, it has to do more with worldview conflicts rather than racism as I will explain.

I spent probably a good portion of my twitter time on the Thursday after his speech interacting with individuals annoyed that I would accuse Platt of essentially bearing false witness against the T4G attendees. I personally do not believe there was one racist in attendance. A number of individuals were especially bothered that I wrote that Platt’s application of Amos 5 to racial injustice in America was wildly off target and way outside the bounds of the prophet’s context. More on that in a moment.

One pastor, Garrett Kell, (who seems to be a real nice guy, by the way) tweeted out a series of questions of those disagreeing with Platt’s message. I thought they encapsulated my key problems with the talk, so I will allow them to shape my response to Platt in this article.

1. Should Amos 5 be applied to any injustices in our day? If so, which ones? Abortion? Sex-trafficking? Euthanasia? If racism were present in the church, should it apply?

I will say that the most aggravating aspect of Platt’s message was his flagrant misuse of Amos 5. I spent the most time tweeting with individuals attempting to defend him. Ultimately, it comes down to one’s hermeneutic and how a person not only interprets the Bible, but makes application of the text. My antagonists hold to a historic, redemptive-Christological hermeneutic. That means they believe the coming of Jesus somehow allows them to exercise way too much freedom for reinterpreting and misapplying the OT text. I could dedicate an entire blog article just on debunking this first question, but I need to stay focused.

Suffice it to say at this point, Platt started out well in his use of Amos 5. For the first 10 minutes or so, he gave the background and provided the injustices from the text that explain why God is judging Israel. After he establishes what Amos 5 is about, that is when his talk went off the rails. It was clear he was only using Amos 5 as a “proof-text” for his pet issue.  He quickly transitioned by stating something like (sorry, pulling this from memory here), “This text beckons us to ask the question, have we been or are we now slow to speak against racial injustice around us.” And he was off shaming the white audience there in the arena.

I am sorry, but Amos 5 has nothing to do with racial injustice in the modern United States. Even MLK’s misapplication of 5:24 will not change this reality. Various detractors challenged my assertion by writing such asinine comments like, “You’re one of those people who thinks a biblical text only has one meaning” and “You’re the problem with Christians in America today, the ones ignoring the OT” and other nonsensical platitudes.

I can say Amos 5 is not applicable to racial injustice in America because Amos expressly states what injustices he had in mind when he rebuked Israel. Most specifically, judges who perverted justice in the gate and the rich who took advantage of the poor. Amos goes on to the tell how God will show up and roll down justice and righteousness on their heads. Keep in mind that God is saying this to a covenant nation who were breaking the commands of the covenant that pertain to loving your neighbor. The best application is toward a church or churches involved in taking advantage of the disadvantaged and the poor in general.

Now as for application in a modern, racial context. Are there black people who have experienced a Heat of the Night judge who misused the American justice system to abuse them. Most certainly. But what relevance is that for white Christians in 2018 attending the T4G conference and listening to Platt’s message online? Why is he calling on people to address racism when there is no racism even present at the conference? American white Christians are not to be held accountable for worldly judicial abuse of black Americans. Unless of course the judge claimed to be a Christian.

2. Which of his 6 exhortations do you think were unbiblical?

Pastor Kell then reproduces Platt’s six exhortations he gave to the audience at T4G. I will look at each one in turn and offer my response.

1) Look at the reality of racism –  Okay, sure. Can Platt provide us clear examples of racism in the modern church? The examples he suggested, predominately white churches, white Bible colleges and seminaries, and Christian conferences, DO NOT prove racism exists among Christians. Blacks uncomfortable in white churches and whites uncomfortable in black churches also DOES NOT prove racism. If anything, right or wrong, it proves people like to hang with their own people group.

I know for the majority of white Christians, what draws them together is shared theological and ecclesiastical convictions. When you share theological, doctrinal, and ecclesiastical kinship, the fellowship is sweet no matter your skin color. I know black Christians that share a closer theological kinship with me than a lot of white folks I know. I eagerly enjoy the fellowship I have with them because of that.

 2) Live in true multi-ethnic community – It seems like I am hearing this new woke generation telling us that if our churches don’t have an equal amount of blacks, Asians, Hispanics, Canadians, etc, you’re doing church wrong. Of course, what about those churches in Salem, Missouri, where the closest individuals of any minority are two to three hours away in St. Louis or Kansas City? Are those rural Christians living in true, multi-ethnic community as a 100% white church, or are they required to bus minorities in on Sunday mornings? Are they “sacrificing their preferences,” as Platt said?

Again, what sets the Christian community apart from all other communities is the fundamental and transcendent work of the Gospel. Even Platt said as much.  Christians from every tribe, tongue, and nation who are saved, converted sinners now following Jesus. They desire to live godly in Christ Jesus. They worship together because of that reality. That is true, ethnic community. There is not a church anywhere  preventing that from happening due in part to racism.

3) Listen to and learn from one another – In his talk, Platt pointed out the large chasm between the worldviews of white and black Christians. The example he noted was how in the last election, 80% of white Christians voted for Trump, whereas 80% of black Christians voted for Clinton. He presents a kind of Polyannish notion that if white and black believers would just listen to and learn from one another, such massive worldview separations will be bridged. Of course, it is implied that white Christians have the greater responsibility to listen and learn, not the other way around.

But as I noted, what we have here is a worldview difference and I don’t believe any amount of listening and learning from either side will ever bridge it. As a white Christian, I am grieved that many black Christians have worked in tandem with a leftist political party that has savaged their communities. The most horrifying example being Plan Parenthood’s mechanized butchery of their unborn. That is an injustice far greater than racism. Are they willing to not only listen and learn from my outrage, but to repent and drive those human slaughterhouses out of their neighborhoods?

 4) Love and lay aside our preferences for one another –  Platt suggests a laying aside of our individual personal preference issues, what ever that means. He was kind of vague, I thought. If laying aside preference issues means I compromise my convictions or have to change the way I preach and do church, that’s not gonna happen. And does that cut both ways with the other ethnic groups?

 5) Let’s leverage our influence for justice in the present – Attempting to influence justice is drifting from the stated purpose of the Christian church to go into all the world and make disciples. Now. Will there be individual Christians who will bring to bear their Christian ethics into our society that will in turn influence justice for the better? Certainly. But that is not the mission of the church as a whole.

6) Let’s long for the day when justice will be perfect – Amen, and amen. Only Jesus can do this when he sets up his kingdom on earth.

3. Which of the statistics that David highlighted about the presence of racism / racialization in our country would you disagree with?

It is not a matter of agreeing or disagreeing with statistics. Statistics are statistics. The disagreement is along the lines of whether or not those statistics are truly relevant in exposing alleged racism in the Christian church, and how are we to respond to them. I am personally of the opinion the racism Platt speaks of is greatly exaggerated, if not non-existent. He gives the example of churches targeting specific groups of people to the exclusion of other groups of people for the purpose of rapid, numerical growth. But is that necessarily an inherent racist methodology? If a black family were to join that church, they are not going to be turned away because they are black. More than likely they are of the same targeted social-economic group. They will feel more comfortable in a so-called “white” church that shares their values and worldview convictions.

4. If you did have blind spots in this area, how would you know?

What exactly is meant by “blind spots?” Are those “blind spots” shared equally between both white and black Christians or are they only unique to white Christians? Platt’s message seemed to suggest the latter. Give me some illustrations of those blind spots and maybe I can evaluate whether or not I know I have them.

Worldviews Colliding

Just so that I am clear, I am not denying that racists exist in the Christian church. The hearts of men are desperately wicked. Even those who profess Christ with their mouths can be guilty of that grievous sin across all kinds of ethnic groups.

What I am saying is that David Platt recklessly inflates the systemic racism he claims is in the church. He is correct that there exists a divide between black and white churches, but that has nothing to do with white Christians ignoring injustices made toward the black community or harboring racist blind spots. The deep disparity dividing white churches from black churches has more to do with the distinct cultural worldviews that regrettably conflict with each other. The only true solution is the Gospel of Jesus Christ regenerating hearts and sanctifying sinners. The pastors of both groups need to believe and affirm the whole counsel of the Word of God. They then need to proclaim the Word of God with conviction from their pulpits. If they were to do this, they will not need to identify specific ethnic groups for social justice. It will be God who will bring the diversity to the church. For He has promised a church redeemed by the blood of Christ out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation!

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41 Comments
  1. charles jandecka 2 weeks ago

    Would Platt ask a black congregation why it is so black? Or a yellow congregation the same?
    Is he aware of the differences among “white” congregations in terms of music and preaching style?
    Could it not be a notion of racism, but desire to worship with those of like minds?
    Yep!!!!!!!

  2. […] who claim all white evangelical Christians should repent of the murder of Martin Luther King or lame exhortations from David Platt at T4G for essentially quotas on church composition—the dividers are here and in key leadership […]

  3. chukker 4 months ago

    Reading the term “guilt shame” with regards to David Platt nailed it. David Platt annoys me, and I couldn’t pinpoint why. My introduction to David Platt: Back to the Bible made the fateful decision of giving David Platt yet one more job that he didn’t refuse; now he’s broadcast through my radio every morning.

    David Platt is a guilt shamer. Guilt shamers, by definition, are self-righteous. David Platt is self-righteous. THAT’s why he bugs me.

    As is the case with so many people today – regretfully, mostly the young – they are militant about the smallest things. Every little aspect of service or volunteerism or opinion they provide must be accompanied by an imperious, condescending lecture, or elaborate process. David Platt is this person.

    And this social justice angle creeping into the church (Liberation Theology)? It’s pervasive. Even the White Horse Inn radio program has fallen for it; it berated us whities about racism in the church a couple weeks ago.

    In this age, I’m woefully more disappointed by compromising Christians than I am by the world. The world is just being the world, but ignorant, self-seeking, undiscerning, celebrity-culture Christians reflect their unbelief. And when the church tries to imitate the world, the world will always do it better.

  4. Carter Stinchcomb 4 months ago

    You do realize that there is a whole other side of the coin here, right? You are looking at this from an individualistic worldview. “I’m not a racist, so I have no culpability.” Is that the main worldview of the kingdom of God? What about Shalom, Hesed, Misphat? Justice is not merely retributive, it is also restorative. I do not sense a spirit of love from your response. I sense a spirit of defensiveness and “I’m right”. Having “right knowledge” does not always equal “being right”. Evangelicals have excelled at “right knowledge” but have failed miserably at doing biblical justice and loving one another. Due to our over emphasis on individual righteousness. You need both individual righteousness and the body of Christ action, bringing the kingdom of God here on earth, that is biblical justice. How many churches help people find their spiritual gifts and then use them in the body of Christ to build His kingdom here?

    • Author
      Fredman 4 months ago

      Carter, you would deeply benefit from listening to this Q&A on social justice and racial reconciliation that took place at my church recently. The participants respond to a lot of what you are saying here much better than I could with a five sentence comment.

      https://www.gracechurch.org/sermons/14838

  5. Christina 7 months ago

    Enjoyed your well-articulated points throughout. This sideshow-heresy confusing and meaningless garbage is the reason I am searching for another church at the moment. The fact is, Christ’s work on the cross that destroyed the dividing wall of hostility between Jews and Gentiles – and all people groups for that matter – is a completed work that cannot be added to or diminished. The ministry of reconciliation Paul refers to in II Corinthians is to tell unbelievers the good news – that God has reconciled us back to Him through Christ! As if any human has the power to reconcile groups of people; such racial reconciliation teachers are peddlers of false doctrine and extreme hubris. To claim we need human beings to reconcile people is to implicitly posit Christ’s cross was somehow insufficient. Christ’s reconciliation of men and women to God and between all humankind across cultures, ethnicity, etc. is a completed work. We are charged to tell unbelievers the good news, not “reconcile races of people,” – a notion and foolish practice that is destroying the hearts and the understanding of a lot of people in the church, who do not have a lot of experience studying Scripture. The fact is these reconcilliation peddlers fail to do one of the central commands Christ wants from us – to love our brothers and sisters (I John), to build up the Body of Christ (II Cor.), and to tell and hopefully disciple those who are lost. These “teachers” not only fail to love their brothers and sisters in Christ, they also actively do them harm by attempting to tell them what – depending on your color – what one group has done wrong and that the other group is oppressed. This is NOT the good news. It is deeply harmful and pernicious.

  6. Gary 8 months ago

    Another pastor has succumbed to the pressures of “social justice”. I have never understood why there has to be different categories for justice. Justice is Justice, no matter who, what or where it effects, a true Christian ought to fight for justice. Contrary to Platt’s statement as to why the T4G conference was so “white”, this is the typical tactic of the progressive left. He was White Shaming, he wanted to and probably succeeded in convincing some of the attendees that “blacks” was somehow denied access to the conference. But, anyone who thinks clearly knows that the conference was open to anyone willing to pay the admission price. I have yet to hear of anyone accusing the conference of not selling tickets to “blacks”. So, the obvious fact is, those who were in attendance were those willing to pay the admission fee. As a “black” man, I found it very condescending to suggest that the failures of the “black” people are the responsibility of the “white” man. I realize that the world cannot discuss race relations with civility, but know it seems that the church is falling prey to this ideology. According to Platt, if you are not actively participating in social justice projects or balancing the amount of minorities in your congregation, you are ignoring the plight of the “black man”. He only mentioned what he perceived the “white” man was guilty of, but never mentioned what the “black” community was doing to itself, such as Black on Black crime, high abortion rate, high single mother/fatherless rates and the denigration of its own people, in music videos and movies. This is the new battle for the church, first churches changed their stance on homosexuality, now we must place social justice as the primary purpose of the church and not the preaching of the Gospel.

  7. Author
    Fredman 8 months ago

    – And here I thought you were concerned with context. Again – read the follow up article where he explains.-

    You mean read the follow up article where he backpedals because he was called out as lying against a whole population of innocent people. Rather than “explaining,” he should repent, as forgiveness for mischaracterizing and using race baiting rhetoric. He then should either delete the original article or modify it with an updated clarification that inserts his apology.

    – I did not for one second think he was accusing my actual grandparents of killing MLK but neither am I naive enough to believe the mindset their generation allowed did not contribute to the atrocities that were committed.-

    If his words were so clear to everyone like you, there would had been no reason to issue a clarification. His comments incendiary enough that normal folks read them and thought the man an a-theological bigot.
    The main problem with his original article is that there was no “mindset their generation allowed.” Maybe among rednecks. But that is not the entire Christian church in America at the time. good grief. And if some future person was to write that Christian parents and grandparents were complicit in allowing abortion to continue today during this generation, it would be equally a lie. There is no mindset currently among faithful, Bible-believing Christians who are dismissive of abortion so as to be complicit with the practice today as there was a mindset among the same faithful, Bible-believing Christians who had the same hatred for racism in parts of the country in the 1960s.

    • Paul 8 months ago

      – “Rather than “explaining,” he should repent, as forgiveness for mischaracterizing and using race baiting rhetoric. He then should either delete the original article or modify it with an updated clarification that inserts his apology.”

      And this is your opinion based on your reading of his words.

      – “normal folks read them and thought the man an a-theological bigot.”

      We obviously run in different groups of “normal” folks. It would be my opinion that the “normal” larger evangelical world does not take seriously the “incendiary” opinions of people affiliated with the BTWN/P&P types. It is always amusing to read someone associated with those groups labeling someone else “incendiary.”

      – “Yes. You are.”

      You are really good at pointing out how what someone says is not what they mean no matter what they say. I will say it again: INNOCENT evangelicals should not feel shame for any sins they were not actively a part of nor passively dismissive of … now carry on with telling me how I don’t mean what I just said.

      – “What is being noted is how racism is greatly exaggerated as existing in the white Christian church throughout the country and that it is some unacknowledged crisis that is dividing the Christian church.”

      Again – this is your opinion based on your experience (or lack of). My past and current experience is far different. The past and current experience of many of both my white and black friends is different than yours. It is not exaggerated among those who have lived it – and denying the perception or adjusting the rhetoric does not change the facts.

      – “How does that prove there is systemic racism throughout the evangelical church?”

      You claimed it does not exist. – I am personally of the opinion the racism Platt speaks of is greatly exaggerated, if not non-existent. –
      I proved it does.

      – “My college church in Arkansas baptized black folks AND our lily white pastor married a black man and a white woman. IT was a fabulous celebration. Okay, we both have stories.”

      And your story does not prove it does NOT exist. If anything, you are claiming one side is exaggerated – if not non-existent. As far as I know, no one on the other side is suggesting EVERY church/Christian is racist. I have experienced systemic racism in the evangelical circles where I have lived. Perhaps you have not.

      – “You mean”

      There you go again…

      Just out of curiosity – how many non-white gospel-believing evangelicals have you sat down with to have this conversation?

  8. Author
    Fredman 8 months ago

    Paul writes,
    -I am not guilt shaming innocent evangelicals … no one is. –

    Yes. You are. You can deny it all you want, but as soon as anyone claims there is this systemic racist spirit hovering in the hearts of white Christians against black Christians that the white Christians must acknowledge and make restitution for, you’re guilt shaming. The Bible calls it bearing false witness.

    – But to pretend it did not or does not exist is ridiculous.-

    No one is saying racism does not exist among Christians. What is being noted is how racism is greatly exaggerated as existing in the white Christian church throughout the country and that it is some unacknowledged crisis that is dividing the Christian church.

    – Every story I told above is 100% true … and I could list dozens more. –

    Oh, I’m sure they are. That doesn’t mean there is systemic racism across the entire spectrum of the white church for which white Christians must acknowledge, confess, and make restitution for.

    -My own father (a Baptist pastor) was basically fired from a church in eastern NC b/c he baptized 2 black adult ladies and brought black children in on the buses. He was forced to resign less than 6 months later.-

    And what year was that? And what part of NC was that? How does that prove there is systemic racism throughout the evangelical church? My college church in Arkansas baptized black folks AND our lily white pastor married a black man and a white woman. IT was a fabulous celebration. Okay, we both have stories. So, what?

    – Racism is sin in either direction. But the brutal reality is the history of the church in America is jaded in one direction much more than the other.-

    You mean pockets of the church in regions of the country is jaded in one direction. And get out out of the mindset of 1950s Mississippi.

  9. […] for example, Thabiti Anyabwile, Matt Chandler and David Platt recently raised the specter of racism in the church, the police force, and white America. Are they […]

  10. Paul 8 months ago

    Most black evangelicals: “I have been on the receiving end of blatant racism”

    A few white evangelicals: “No you have not and here is why”

    • Author
      Fredman 8 months ago

      – Most black evangelicals: “I have been on the receiving end of blatant racism”-

      Not from evangelical churches they haven’t. All of the examples Platt gave were secular situations. Not from evangelicals, Bible believing Christians.

      – A few white evangelicals: “No you have not and here is why”–

      Actually, a lot of white evangelicals are typically shocked to be accused of blatant racism, because none of them have ever held a racist thought in their lives. Hence, the few evangelicals who are manufacturing a non-existent crisis in the church because social justice ideology is currently in vogue.

      • Paul 8 months ago

        “Not from evangelical churches they haven’t. All of the examples Platt gave were secular situations. Not from evangelicals, Bible believing Christians.”

        You can’t be this naive. I grew up in large conservative Baptist churches in the 80-90s and frequently heard the n-word used by church lay people and church leaders. In my “youth ministry” the ministry leaders performed a skit that involved a KKK parody. I have had lay leaders tell me “we don’t allow black people in this church” into the 2000s. I have sat with my close black friends and heard story after story of how they have been treated inside and outside the church. In each of these situations, the perpetrators were “Bible-believing evangelical Christians.” So again – you can’t be that naive.

        “Actually, a lot of white evangelicals are typically shocked to be accused of blatant racism, because none of them have ever held a racist thought in their lives. Hence, the few evangelicals who are manufacturing a non-existent crisis in the church because social justice ideology is currently in vogue.”

        And if you listened to those who have been hurt or were not so intent on showing how you are not a racist, you might realize racism is not just about a “racist thought” or hating non-white people.

        See above examples for “manufacturing a non-existent crisis in the church because social justice ideology is currently in vogue.”

        • Author
          Fredman 8 months ago

          – You can’t be this naive.-

          Tell us the church you were apart of that engaged in this behavior. Name names or stop guilt shaming the majority of innocent evangelicals who have never done such a thing. I am from the rural south. Was in an all white church all my life. Never once heard any Christian use racial slurs or do some horrendous skit mocking blacks. I had relatives who used racial slurs in private with other friends, but even my redneck aunt, when she heard her son, my cousin, use the the “N” word, rebuked him to his face for doing so. There wasn’t a black person within an hour of us in any direction. But there she was, telling her son to not speak evil of other people. That was the experience of pretty much ever majority white, evangelical church I ever attended. So this idea that there exists this systemic racism within the evangelical church that all white people are now required to fess up for and flagellate themselves over is again, a manufactured non-existent crisis.

          – And if you listened to those who have been hurt or were not so intent on showing how you are not a racist, you might realize racism is not just about a “racist thought” or hating non-white people.-

          And I can introduce you to a number of black folks who were called “house negro” and “uncle Tom” and “Oreo” because they liked attending a white evangelical church because they church was welcoming and they actually learned the Bible there. That is the exact testimony of Darrell Harrison, for example, if you listen to this podcast here, http://www.ironsharpensironradio.com/podcast/april-5-2018-show-with-darrell-bernard-harrison-and-christopher-harris-on-racism-in-america-are-modern-day-social-justice-warriors-diminishing-or-perpetuating-the-sin-of-bigotry/

          • Paul 8 months ago

            “Name names or stop guilt shaming the majority of innocent evangelicals who have never done such a thing.”

            I am not guilt shaming innocent evangelicals … no one is. That is not the point. But to pretend it did not or does not exist is ridiculous. Every story I told above is 100% true … and I could list dozens more. My own father (a Baptist pastor) was basically fired from a church in eastern NC b/c he baptized 2 black adult ladies and brought black children in on the buses. He was forced to resign less than 6 months later.

            “And I can introduce you to a number of black folks who were called “house negro” and “uncle Tom” and “Oreo” because they liked attending a white evangelical church because they church was welcoming and they actually learned the Bible there.”

            Same … doesn’t change the opposite though. Racism is sin in either direction. But the brutal reality is the history of the church in America is jaded in one direction much more than the other.

      • chukker 4 months ago

        Agree. In the churches that preach solid doctrine and strive for holiness, there are no race issues because the only two races we see are Believers and unBelievers.

        America is so beyond the race issue (although there was an 8-year setback). Usually those who promote race issues are hucksters or rabblerousers. There are enclaves, but I would venture to guess most of them are in the urban areas, not the rural outposts. I worked in the oilfields of the deeeeeeep South; the reddest rednecks had best buds in the field who were black. From my extensive experiences in this country, the average white bubba has no problem whatsoever with law-abiding folk of any color.

  11. Aldo Gudor 8 months ago

    so concerned of racism but. shouldn’t Platt recognize the fact that God has preserved Israel by not allowing them to marry other races, of course Jews had interracial marriages here and there for centuries but they remained Jews. and for centuries the Jewish tribe remained to be Jews of course God has a special plan for them. what I’m trying to say is that God has made us in different tribes. and what is beautiful is that God has given His won Son to Die for all the tribes of the world and Now, We can all Worship God by being what he made us. Sing Praises to Him in different tongues!

  12. Mike Yonce 8 months ago

    Watching Platt reminded me of some of the old gangster movies. You know, where the mafia puts pressure on a store owner to commit some crime for them. The store owner knows that if he doesn’t do it he and/or his family will face significant harm. If he does do it, and gets caught by the law, he knows he will be spending many years in the pen. Platt was that store owner, very nervous, even scared. Compare that to MacAuthur who gave a very biblical message exhorting the pastors present there, and was calm and very much at peace in the Lord. It seems Platt was in the squeeze, and I don’t know if it was from external pressure or internally, in his own mind.

    When Platt started giving statistics I wondered why he left out some such as the black on black crime rate. Or better yet, how about abortion in the black community. Fred Butler retweeted a post stating that although blacks make up 14% of the U.S. population, they account for 36% of the abortions. Well, let’s take a closer look at that.

    Planned Parenthood, in keeping with its founder’s goals, one of which was to keep the “unfit” from reproducing, sets up most of its clinics in minority neighborhoods. I invite you to read about Margaret Sanger on Wikipedia, and especially the section entitled “Work with the African-American community”, where you will also find a certain person’s name listed which is of recent interest. Although there has been some polishing of her image by many, her eugenicist motives are hard to argue against. It has been many black leaders, many of them ministers, that have promoted and supported PP over the years. And a substantial majority of the black community votes for the party that whole-heartedly supports PP and abortion. Yet PP is performing genocide in the black community, and few blacks seem to care that they are endorsing ethnic suicide, that is, their own. David, why aren’t you upset about that, and want to do something about it, for example?

    It seems to me that these last few weeks many Christians have been “carried away” by all the talk about white racism and the need for repentance and making changes in society. It reminds me of what happened in Galatians 2:13. But I see far more division than unity being the result. Is it sin to build up what Christ has torn down (Eph 2:11-22 and Gal 3:26-28)? I am so thankful for the many Christian leaders that are applying the brakes on this. It’s one thing to promote honest and open discussion, which is always needed. It is another to guilt-shame all whites and place all blame on them. I heartily believe in justice, especially the justice that was accomplished on the cross where my sins were paid for in full, and I am declared by God to be innocent, and justified. That is still THE MESSAGE that needs to be front and center, always and everywhere.

    A few days ago I attended a conference at our sending church. One of the two speakers has been a white pastor in a minority neighborhood for 11 years. He said his zip code is the second poorest in our nation. But he went in there with the Gospel, not the “social gospel,” and is making a real and eternal difference in that community.

    I love my brothers and sisters of all ethnicities, and hope they love me. But if there is any unknown sin in my heart I pray that the Lord will reveal it to me (Psa 139:23-24). Brother Platt, you preached from the Old Testament at the conference. The next time you do that, how about using Ezekiel 18:19-20 as your text?

    • chukker 4 months ago

      In a Rasmussen poll from 2013, Americans expressed their opinions that blacks were more racist than whites or other minority groups.

  13. Jake 8 months ago

    This is an intriguing read; glad I found it. I never considered that the word “justice” was being misapplied there. I also didn’t consider that I may have been reading “too much New Testament” into the OT. I’ll have to think about that more.

    Quick question, though (and to the other commenters: I have no interest in arguing — I just want more information — so please just let Mr. Butler respond):
    What exactly is the worldview difference is between predominantly white churches and predominantly black churches that you mentioned in the last paragraph? I have a friend who attends a black church, and I’ve been wondering this myself recently. Thank you!

    • Author
      Fredman 8 months ago

      Jake,
      The primary world view distinctions is the toleration of the black community of a leftist political party that really has, as I stated in my article, savaged their community. The rampant fatherlessness as well as the working with PP in their neighborhoods. Pastor Clementa Pinckney, who, along with a number of his congregation, was tragically murdered by a racist thug kid, was a major advocate for abortion. Only a few people noted his pro-abortion activism as a South Carolina state representative after the shooting, because to do so would get angry social media trolls to hate on you. Think of that: A man who is a pastor, supposedly preaching the Word of God, defended abortion, the slaughter of the innocent unborn. The dissonance between those two activities is symphonic. Those are severe distinctions that no one can honestly ignore in the discussion as to why there exists a disparity between black Christians and White Christians.

      • Jake 8 months ago

        That makes a lot of sense, actually. The friend I mentioned to you is a very involved in her church (not sure about her salvation), and is also deeply liberal politically. I know she’s just one example, but statistics show too that black churchgoers do tend to have political beliefs that openly contradict the Bible. Rejecting something as basic as the sanctity of life is very troubling and worth separating ourselves over.

        That said, the Gospel is able to convict of every sin, including leftist political beliefs like those. Like you said, the Church’s mission is only to preach the Gospel. Thus, we should keep preaching the Gospel to and praying for our black brothers and sisters to grow in repentance in that area. As the Gospel advances and changes hearts, I think this worldview divide will become smaller, and I believe the best way to advance the Gospel is by continuing to invite black believers into our churches.

        This won’t meet Platt’s “diversity quota” (which I think is ridiculous), and black believers may reject our invitations, but our hands should still be open. What do you think?

        • Jake 8 months ago

          Upon rereading your article, I just realized that was exactly your point too. Nevermind. Thank you for responding!

  14. Jim Harrison 8 months ago

    I live and pastor in a community which is 90% white. In our small church with a Lord’s Day attendance of under 100, we have all kinds of ethnicities…African, African-American, various flavors of hispanic and asian, etc. We are what we are though the racial makeup of our congregation, and the idea that we should be intentional about it, has never crossed our minds. We are who God, in His sovereignty, wants us to be. We are who we are as a result of God working through the proclamation of His word. Our racial composition is no reason for pride, and if we were all white, it would be no reason for shame. Our call is to proclaim the gospel to the lost, edify, equip, and disciple the body, and in doing so, to bring glory to our God. We will seek to be faithful to His word, and to love one another, not because of skin tone, but because we are brothers and sisters in Christ. We’re happy to leave judgments of racism on the basis of imaginary and arbitrary racial quotas to others.

  15. Cathy 8 months ago

    You are right about one thing in this article, you’re a white guy who has blind spots concerning racism so you should keep your mouth shut.

    • Author
      Fredman 8 months ago

      Oh. Only woke white people like David Platt can say something? Got it.

    • Daron 8 months ago

      Cathy u r the racist whi should keep ur mouth shut

      • Author
        Fredman 8 months ago

        Seriously? What on earth brings you to such a despicable conclusion about me, a person you have never met, just because you read and dislike my disagreeing comments against David Platt? You cannot possible be this illogical and knee-jerk with your thinking.

  16. John 8 months ago

    I would like to call upon all Right-handed members of the Body of Christ to repent.
    Most Right-handed people are not conscious of their Right-handedness.
    To be Right-handed in America means not having to think about it.
    Right-handed people go about their day to day lives with little or no thought about their Left-handed brethren.

    If you were born Right-handed, you were born with Dexterity Privilege.
    If you were born Right-handed, it is impossible for you not to be a Dexterist.
    Left-handed people have never lived in a world where the majority is Left-handed.
    Therefore, it is impossible for a Left-handed person to be Dexterist.

    Right-handed people, you must all repent of your Dexterism!!!

    • Friend 8 months ago

      😄

  17. Michael Shugart 8 months ago

    Redemptive-Christological hermeneutics?? Jesus might just well be rolling His eyes right now. So many Christians are being bogged down by distractions. Let’s try preaching the true Gospel. Episcopal/Catholic/Methodist/Wesleyans… try finding out if your congregation is saved, monitor your Sunday School classes and see where the “progressive” teachers are leading them.

  18. Chris Nelson 8 months ago

    These race pimps are getting old. They are the racists.

  19. Friend 8 months ago

    His speech coincides too closely with Thabiti Anyabwile’s message on TGC, where he demands all whites apologize for murdering mLk. Platt could have simply apologized in private if he feels so strongly that he is a racist. No need to drag everyone else into his own guilt trip. I hope there were many elder pastors at this Together event who took platt aside and rebuked him.

    • Paul 8 months ago

      Based on the fact you misrepresented Thabiti’s words, we will discount the remainder of the post as well.

      • Author
        Fredman 8 months ago

        Thabiti literally wrote that. You can’t be this obtuse and out of touch,

        https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/thabiti-anyabwile/await-repentance-assassinating-dr-king/

        • Paul 8 months ago

          Thabiti: https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/thabiti-anyabwile/he-said-she-said/

          Fred: let me tell you what you really said Thabiti

          • Author
            Fredman 8 months ago

            -Fred: let me tell you what you really said Thabiti-

            This is a direct citation from the guy, HIS WORDS:

            “My white neighbors and Christian brethren can start by at least saying their parents and grandparents and this country are complicit in murdering a man who only preached love and justice.”

            This is a great sin on his part. It is bearing false witness and sowing discord among the brethren. There is not one of his christian brethren, parents, or grandparents complicit in murdering MLK. He can try to walk it back all he wants. So the anonymous commenter above was correct.

          • Friend 8 months ago

            He is back pedaling

          • Paul 8 months ago

            And here I thought you were concerned with context. Again – read the follow up article where he explains.

            I had no problem understanding what Thabiti was saying in that statement. I did not for one second think he was accusing my actual grandparents of killing MLK but neither am I naive enough to believe the mindset their generation allowed did not contribute to the atrocities that were committed. My grandfather loved the black men with whom he worked … he also referred to them as “n-s” and often used derogatory language about the overall race … while he was also a deacon in his Baptist church.

            I have no doubt future generations will look at our generation and question why we allowed the blatant murder of the unborn. And in some sense, we will be culpable for the allowed sin.

  20. Matthew Wingler 8 months ago

    I have heard Pastor Kell preach and have spoken with him briefly, and you thinking is correct. He is a very nice man, who is passionate for biblical unity, and for biblical truth prevailing among the brothers. His list of questions relies on a hermeneutic that even he doesn’t use in his own preaching (he is a very good exegete). I have no problem when anyone preaches against racism, but it is always a one-way street with the topic. Platt should know better than to conflate our modern day view of justice with God’s.

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