Seat Belts are RAciSt to Fat People

On today’s program, JD discusses the racial unity lessons learned from Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, then gets to the news topics of the day from Protestia. Afterward, he discusses Russell Moore getting a religious freedom award and why seat belts are RaCIsT against fat people (and why Critical Theory leads to such conclusions). Then, he talks gluttony.

The Polemics Report

Pastor JD Hall of Pulpit & Pen compares what people are saying about God to the Word of God. A podcast designed to train your ability to discern between right and almost right. Highlighting the “downgrade” of modern Christianity.

2 Comments
  1. Wade Regan 6 months ago

    JD – Hope all is well with you. After the riots (protests?) broke out in light of the George Floyd death (killing?) the church I currently attend put out this statement on Racism. I was like why are they doing this? So I ask one of the elders and he told me that we NEED to show mercy to black people because they are hurting? I thinking hurting because a criminal died of a drug overdose in Minneapolis – and do we know that we know if this “killing” was racist? I thinking do not we as Christian deal with the TRUTH? Maybe we should wait until the investigation is done – just saying! Also, as a church should we not PROCLAIM THE GOSPEL OF JESUS CHRIST first instead of calling out Racism (1 Corth. 15)?? See the statement below. The more I read this statement – the more I have a problem with it – to me if I was a black person reading this statement – I would find this very condescending to me. Your thoughts if you want to reply – wade408@yahoo.com

    Lake Baldwin Church Statement on Racism
    We affirm that all people are created in the image of God. We affirm the dignity and value of every human life, from the womb to the tomb.

    We lament and grieve the senseless deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and all others, killings made worse when part of a pattern of racism. In all these cases we pray for justice, and for the families of the victims.

    We hear the words of Proverbs 31:8-9– “Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute. Speak up and judge fairly; defend the rights of the poor and needy.” As we speak up for the unborn, we speak up for all those who are unjustly treated, including those who are people of color.

    We believe in original sin, and acknowledge our many sins against God and neighbor. We acknowledge that racism is not only part of original sin, but is abhorrent to God. We believe that God has called us, not only to general repentance, but to repentance of particular sins. So we turn from the evil of racism in our country and in our hearts.

    We affirm the right and legitimacy of peaceful protest, and stand with those who cry out for an end to systemic injustice. We deplore any form of violence and destruction.

    We deplore the degrading actions of some police officers, who have sworn to uphold the law and to protect citizens. But we also give thanks for the police officers who daily risk their lives to protect us, and who today are being exposed to danger when protests turn violent.

    We affirm the words of Jesus, who said that sin originates in the human heart. “For from within, out of men’s hearts, come evil thoughts, sexual immorality, theft, murder, adultery, greed, malice, deceit, lewdness, envy, slander, arrogance and folly.” (Mark 7:21-22). We also affirm the good news of the gospel, that through his death and resurrection, Christ cleanses our hearts from sin and renews our hearts to love God and neighbor.

    As those redeemed by God through Christ, we weep with those who weep, and mourn with those who mourn. We come alongside and stand with our brothers and sisters who are people of color. We hear and believe their stories of both subtle and overt racism, of ill treatment and fear. We embrace them as part of our community of faith, where Christ has not only bridged the gap between God and humankind, but has torn down the dividing wall between people of all ethnicities. (Ephesians 2)

    We believe that God has given us the home for the instruction and care of children. So we call on parents to raise their children to respect the dignity of all people created in the image of God.

    We believe that God has given the government to use its authority to oppose evil and to protect the innocent. So we call on political leaders at every level to uphold our laws and to change laws that are unjust.

    We believe that God has given the church as an instrument of his peace in a broken world. So we call on the church to offer the hope of the gospel and to work on behalf of the widow and the orphan, and for all the marginalized, without partiality. (James 1:27)

    We hear and heed the words of the prophet Micah: “He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?”

    We pray and live and hope in light of the promise of Revelation 7:9– “After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one can number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, ‘Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!’”

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